The Power of Yes

The Power of Yes

In the movie, Yes Man, Carl Allen (portrayed by Jim Carrey), is mired in his negative ways until the day he attends a self-help seminar that teaches the power of saying yes. The results are immediate—new job promotion, new romance, but true to Hollywood form, Carl discovers that too much of anything can be bad for you. The road to happiness is a little more complex than simply saying yes. Still, the concept that giving to others improves your health and happiness is not a screenwriter’s fantasy. Saying yes gives you permission to receive positive energy. It fuels creativity and creates trust and safety amongst others.

In our daily lives, the inclusion of others to create positive interactions begin with saying yes. This does not mean we agree with everything, but we provide affirmation that the person is heard. By simply, nodding or saying, yes, we are passing on positive energy to the speaker. Short phrases such as, “Yes, I hear you,” or “Yes, your words are important,” are positive ways to engage the speaker. Even if we disagree, we should acknowledge value in the speaker’s words. This reduces the chance of speaker becoming defensive. It promotes openness and positive inclusion.

By saying yes, we can also produce positive energy in our everyday lives. When we focus our energy on believing that we can succeed, complete a task, or reach a goal, we are giving our inner selves permission to try. Conversely, no is the beginning of fear. Starting with yes, we are freed from self-doubt and fear. Empowered, we can take the positive energy and reach for our goals.

The power of yes produces positive energy and a sense of value. Just as depicted in the movie, Yes Man, too much of “yes,” can lead to negative consequences such as loss of standards and accountability and a sense of recklessness. This power must be tempered with common sense.

So, go forth and embrace the power of Yes!

Reach out to me, AmyD the Peak Performance Expert and Trainer, if you want to learn how you can harness the power of yes- so that you can be the most effective, focused and driven leader you can be.

Gratitude and Grace

Gratitude and Grace

As the Peak Performance Expert, I help people remove the mental limitations that prevent them from achieving greater success 
 
One of the main emotional blocks I see among my clients and others, time and time again, is this: a diminished capacity for gratitude.  
 
We, as a society, seem to have forgotten what it means to receive with grace. To experience and express gratitude, which is a blessing in itself. 
 
In fact, we’ve replaced the practice of gratitude with a negative mindset, that of dissatisfaction. We spend each and every hour striving to do more and be more without taking a moment, a mindful pause, to give thanks to the universe and our Creator for all the resources we already have. 
 
Instead, we barrel forward with our heads down, focused entirely on the end result rather than the present moment that is perfect just as it is. 
 
In fact, it is God who reminds us of our innate perfection. Not only is this moment perfect, but we too are made perfect in His image. God also reminds us that generosity is part of the natural order. Romans 8:32 speaks of the grace that comes with giving and receiving: 
“He who did not spare his own Son, but gave him up for us all—how will he not also, along with him, graciously give us all things?” Romans 8:32
The good news is that you can beginning practice gratitude in the here and now. You can give yourself permission to feel joy in receiving the gifts of the universe. When you open your heart to this energy, you will only ever attract positive things. 
 
Greet each moment with your palms up. You can think of palms up in a figurative way, signifying an open-hearted and receptive approach toward the universe. 
 
You can also practice this position literally by sitting in meditation with your palms up. Mindfully consider the things in your life that you’re grateful for. We often take the things in our lives for granted, so now is the time to pause and give thanks for the small things that give our lives meaning will in turn bring those larger gifts we desire i.e. abundance, prosperity, peace of mind, high quality relationships, strong communication skills.  
 
When you practice gratitude, it becomes habitual, something that comes naturally to you. You are in effect creating more life-affirming energy that sustains you rather than depletes you, as I’ve explained in another article about the laws of biocentrism.  
Here’s another way of putting this elegant, simplified truth. When we appreciate even the smallest things, such as a kind gesture or the check in our hand, our liveliness quite literally appreciates. It leads to an endless, abundant energetic flow, an increase in the value and positive meaning of our lives over time. 
 
Energy attracts like energy. If you’re ready to begin the life-altering practice of transforming your current energy in new, positive, elevating waysreach out to me. I look forward to beginning that journey with you! 
Finding Commitment to Our Best Selves 

Finding Commitment to Our Best Selves 

In 2012, the New York Giants’ future seemed destined to end without a post-season berth. They were 7-7 and drowning in penalties, sloppy play, and low morale. After a particularly awful game, the next night the players attended chapel. There high school teacher, Gian Paul Gonzalez, spoke to them about being all in.  According to Gonzalez, when playing poker and you feel confident in your hand, you go all in. Being all in became their rallying cry to action, and a call for each member of the organization to re-evaluate their commitment to success. Gonzalez challenged them to be their best selves. The Giants’ team players successfully went on to win the Super Bowl. When you know you have a winning hand, you don’t hesitate to take the risk. That’s the feeling leaders should inspire in those around them and in themselves whether they can clearly see the winning hand or not.

Throughout the course of our lives, we lose focus. At those times, we don’t present our best. That loss comes for a variety of reasons. For example, during the last few weeks, many have been tested by the throes of Mother Nature. Hurricanes, wildfires, and earthquakes have left many in our communities feeling harried. In these challenging moments, we have two choices—to present our best or not.

When we shift our energies from a negative focus, we reconnect to our goals. We can do so via mediation, helping others, and utilizing the team around us. When we do, we find success. We are able to rediscover inspiration and reignited spark. We must avoid being swept away in the sea of emotion that forces us to lose sight of the shore.  Having a solid team to hold you accountable can help us remain tethered to our being our best.

One of the other ways we can remain focused is to train our brain to be focused on a singular task. According to David Rock, co-founder of the NeuroLeadership Institute, we should train our brain like a muscle. The ideal of multitasking has trained our brain to be unfocused. To train our brains to focus, we should start by spending small chunks of time concentrating on completing a singular task. Practice daily. If your mind wanders, redirect it back to the task at hand. Increase the time as you would when implementing a new workout regimen.

Another way to remain focused, in addition to brain exercises and mediation, is to pay attention to where you do your best work. According to Rock, most people do their best thinking when not in an office. So, pay attention to the location in which you are most focused. These are your touchstones, your focal points. Revisit these areas when you feel unconnected and need to reconnect to your goals.

When you feel unfocused or drifting from your goals, be an advocate for yourself. Seek out your team to help you reconnect and recommit. Getting the help you need when you need it is part of the success. That success can in turn, lead you to being your best. And, keep in mind, your team is generally well defined when you consider work, but in personal matters, your team can be advocates from a wide range of family, friends and even acquaintances that share a mutual concern or interest. Remember to accept your advocates and support from those unlikely sources so you can maintain your Power of Yes.

 

 

How to be an Emotional Leader

How to be an Emotional Leader

Are you a leader who manages people? The answer can determine how effective you are as a leader. Employees aren’t robots. They’re people with feelings and emotions. Emotionally aware leaders balance the day-to-day work and their employees’ engagement. Their success is often a direct correlation with adaptable thinking. According to a report from the Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, the benefits emotional leaders receive in the workplace are higher employee retention rates, greater commitment, and better results. In short, an emotional leader is a beacon of light to others they lead.

How can a leader not only navigate the landscape of multiple personalities and emotions, but put it to use? First, it requires decoding emotions and an understanding of visual cues. In addition, the leader will need to be able to communicate differently to individuals based on their personality styles.

Effective leaders incorporate emotion by using these four skill sets:

  • Self-awareness

Leaders who are aware of their emotional state are able to control their egos. Participating in activities that assist in finding mental clarity such as meditation, hiking, reading, or exercising, leaders become more connected to themselves by disconnecting to the world around them. This allows them to look inward for perspective. Leaders who are self-aware also see clearly the strengths and weaknesses of themselves and those they lead. They can perceive emotions and address problems more thoroughly. This clarity helps master egos which is important to leading effectively.

  • Self-management

Leaders who are aware of their emotions are better equipped to manage them. When leaders are in control of their emotions, they know how they react to others. They do not fly off the handle or make hasty decisions. Emotional leaders are aware of the impact of their own emotions on others and manage those emotions accordingly. Focusing and practicing being in the present can assist with self-management of emotions. Journaling and paying attention to one’s inner self talk is another helpful means of self-management of emotions.

  • Social-awareness

Leaders who are self-aware and manage their emotions, also have the ability to pick up on others’ emotional cues. This skill is important for impactful leadership. When leaders are socially aware, they are more likely to understand the employees’ point of view and emotional response. They are also able to tailor their feedback based upon their awareness of the person’s emotional state. Leaders do this by watching, listening, and discovering others’ cues.

  • Relationship-management

Leaders combine communication and team building to manage conflict and inspire employees. Clear communication is imperative, but so is understanding and empathy. Employing self-awareness, self-management, and social-awareness assists in achieving the balance within the leaders’ communication. Leaders who employ this style of communication will find it easier to cultivate relationships naturally thus reducing conflict within their team.

As already discussed, emotional leaders are present in the moment. They are connected to their feelings and have a clarity about their purpose. They keep their ego in check. With their connection to self, emotional leaders will be open to others’ emotional states. They can provide support to others whether they are doing well or struggling.

In contrast, when leaders avoid connecting to emotions, they may feel more in control, but it can have a negative impact on the organization. Control is ego driven and does not take people into consideration. As Richard Rose stated, “Ego is the single biggest obstruction to the achievement of anything.”

The Harvard Business Review, Manfred F.R. Kets de Vries talks about four toxic leadership styles. All four are deeply rooted in promoting the leader’s ego. These can be alleviated by being a leader that understands both verbal and non-verbal emotional cues.

  • Narcissist. This leadership style involves an inconsiderate and selfish leader who puts their need above others for attention. These types of leaders are prone to belittling others. They are self-centered so everything must be about them. Thus, they are often exploitive.
  • Manic-depressive. This leader has a way of swinging back and forth between highs and lows. These types of leaders create an environment of uncertainty. There is no middle ground with these types of leaders. For example, they may draw people to them when experiencing a high. When experience a low, these leaders blame others which comes as a surprise when experienced for the first time. While manic-depression can be an illness, it can also be a leadership style.
  • Passive aggressive. This leadership style avoids confrontation even when it is staring them in the face. They express emotions, but only indirectly. With low self-esteem, they may miss deadlines and procrastinate. These types of leaders will undermine projects and blame others. They will become defense when confronted and are often contradictory. They will agree with an idea to avoid confrontation, but will sabotage it one way or another.
  • Emotional disconnected. These leaders struggle to read emotional cues of others, and they have a flat manner. They often are matter of fact in their responses and appear apathetic. Their team may view them as detached and caring only about work or the job.

Emotional leaders will need to be aware of their impact on others. Exercising your mind each day to not only remain keen and precise, but also adaptable, as rigid thinking limits your paths to success. Avoiding those four toxic leadership styles will also help strengthen you as a successful leader.

Reach out to me, AmyD the Peak Performance Expert and Trainer, if you want to learn how you can transition to an emotional leader! Email me today, Amy@AmyD.me.

The Science of Light Therapy

The Science of Light Therapy

Modern science is re-discovering what the ancients have always understood – that certain frequencies of light can alter the physical properties of our bodies, charging the energy in our cells and speeding up the process of healing. 

Researchers are investigating frequency of light therapy for its capacity to heal numerous physical and emotional ailments and disorders – everything from muscle pain and inflammation to thyroid and metabolic disorders, skin injuries to anxiety.  

Even certain neurodegenerative disorders have been shown to benefit from frequency of light therapy. How is this possible?  

Our minds and bodies are almost entirely composed of electromagnetic energy. In fact, you can think of your self as a single electromagnetic field, constantly emitting and receiving energy from other bodies.  

 

That includes frequencies of light. Because we rely on the movement and transference of positive energy for our existence, different light frequencies can be beneficial to us depending on their wavelengths. Some low-frequency wavelengths are long, slow and weak, while others have a quicker vibration that can assist in our body’s natural healing processes. 

Frequency of light therapy can balance and restore a body’s disrupted energy field, improving our physical and emotional conditions.  

It’s so effective, that healthcare companies like Aetna support light therapy in treating athletes’ muscle and bone injuries. For decades, light therapy has also been used to heal negative emotional conditions like depression and Seasonal Affective Disorder.  

That’s why I make the BioCharger™ available to my clients. The BioCharger™ speeds up muscle recovery, improves your mobility, and helps you sustain the positive emotional states that are necessary for your success. Visit my website to learn more about how I implement BioCharger™ light therapy in my practice. You can also kickstart your own personalized, bio-energetic program by scheduling an Energy Assessment. 

So many of our physical and emotional limitations are the result of negative energy exchanges. You can go beyond the limitations your mind has set for you, beginning with today! 

The Adversity Agent

The Adversity Agent

With the new year approaching, everyone is looking to overcome adversity and better themselves. The idea of resolving to better yourself in the new year is a great one and further proves that adversity or turmoil in your life can lead to change for the better.

This is especially true within your profession. Sometimes facing a bit of turmoil can wind up providing a meaningful career move in the long run.

In fact, this was true for Hall-of-Fame football player Peyton Manning. While we all know Peyton to be a successful athlete, not every moment in his career has been picture-perfect. Prior to his 2011 season with the Indianapolis Colts, he underwent multiple neck surgeries, forcing him to sit out the 2011 season. The team neglected to play Manning again in the 2012 season in anticipation of signing quarterback Andrew Luck.

After signing Luck, the Colts released Manning. He signed with the Denver Broncos and in the 2013 season shattered offensive records. In 2013, Manning threw 5,477 yards and 55 touchdowns for the Broncos. He was able to recover from serious surgery and push through adversity to cap his career with another Super Bowl win in 2016.

Everything looked like it was over for Indiana Pacers’ Paul George when he was injured during the summer of 2014. Similar to Manning, George faced adversity, got back in, trained hard and focused on what he needed to do to make his dream happen, despite everything that fell in his path. When he returned to play basketball, George was averaging his career-best at 23.1 points a game.

So, how can you be like these athletes and leverage your adversity for change and success?

To overcome adversity and leverage it for success, you need to have the right mindset. What is going on in your mind is essential to your overall success. You will need to change your beliefs about the challenges you are facing. For instance, an athlete not being played may think to himself that he’s not good enough. Having these thoughts weigh you down will prevent you from overcoming this challenge and prevent you from growing and improving.

As you alter your mindset, embrace the changes that come your way. Peyton Manning could have easily ended his career in 2012 and still have been seen as a successful football player. Instead, when the Colts cut him, Manning just rolled with the punches and found a home in Denver. His ability to adapt is what helped him continue his career for another four years.

A huge part of adapting to change is to decide that you are going to stop making excuses for each failure. Instead, pick yourself up, dust yourself off, and choose to make your dreams reality. If Paul George made excuses he would have never come back the season after being injured to play the best season of his career. Think about the goals you could reach if you stopped making excuses.

Facing adversity isn’t easy. Whether it is within your profession or your personal life, continuously facing turmoil can wear on you. So, if you have a good day, or if you made some small progress towards your goal, celebrate. It is okay to feel good and acknowledge the things going well in your life.

Finally, one of the keys to using adversity as a springboard for change is to seek support. Having someone to confide in and look to for guidance can make all the difference when you’re experiencing hard times. Let me know how I can help you. We can have a confidential discussion to see if a session would benefit you. Contact me via email at Amy@AmyD.me or schedule a call directly on my calendar.